Managing your Digital Estate

Managing your Digital Estate

The digital age has seen an exponential rise in social media and internet usage and, with it, a whole range of digital assets.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics shows that the total internet subscribers in Australia reached 12,358,000 at the end of June last year and 6.2 million Australians used mobile wireless broadband.

This indicates that a growing number of Australians are spending more time on their social media accounts, creating more personal material, with many having accrued thousands of dollars’ worth of digital possessions such as individually curated music, movies and e-books.

Digital Estate Blog
Digital Estate Blog
A Legal, Digital Legacy
How would you like your digital legacy to be addressed? Do you have any particular wishes – to memorialise the information, pass the assets onto family beneficiaries or, for privacy’s sake, have the accounts shut down? Bethanie Castell, a Wills and Estates lawyer with Adelaide firm Tindall Gask Bentley, offers these insightful recommendations for those who are unsure how to approach their digital estate.

The legal way to list your digital assets is by putting pen to paper. When drafting your Will, simply add a section for your digital assets and how you wish for them to be managed when you pass away.

Phrase your digital instructions as wishes, rather than legally binding directions, as, your executor will still be bound to the terms and conditions of the various online accounts.

Record all your passwords (work, banking, social media etc.) on separate document stored with your Will, so you won’t have to update your Will every time you change a password.

Lastly, appoint someone who’s technologically savvy as your Digital Executor.

“It may take time before we see Wills and Estates legislation specifically mentioning digital assets, but that doesn’t mean it is isn’t important to think about digital assets and provide for them while you can,” Castell said.

Your Family Future Checklist
So, when it comes to planning for your families future wellbeing in the years after you’ve departed, your estate planning checklist might look like this;

Make sure your own Will and Estate executor and beneficiaries are updated.
Clarify your Digital Estate, digital assets wish lists and your appointed digital executor.
Compile your digital assets purchased online, including music, movies and e-books.
And of course, keep your Lifebroker Life Insurance policy and beneficiaries up-to-date as well
Understandably, the concept of a Digital Estate can be quite confusing so talk to a legal Succession Planning expert. To discuss your Life Insurance and Beneficiaries options, talk to an expert consultant at Lifebroker today, so you can work towards the peace of mind that financial security can offer your family.

The information contained in this website has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or particular needs and is General Advice only. Lifebroker Pty Ltd (the authorising licensee AFSL 400209) or any related companies will not be held responsible for the merits of this advice to your circumstances.

Don't Let Your Digital Assets Die With You

Digital Estate Planning Law

The May 2013 issue of the Internet Law Researcher newsletter (which is available to members of the Duke Law community through Westlaw‘s GLILR database) rounds up a bibliography of legislation and articles related to digital asset estate planning. To locate the article in Westlaw Classic or WestlawNext, use the citation 18 No. 5 Internet L. Researcher 1.

Planning for death has always been an uncomfortable and difficult topic for most people, and the growth of social media and other online accounts has added a new layer of complexity to sorting out the affairs of the recently deceased. Author Ken Kozlowski describes the current situation as “a big mess” in which “the federal Stored Communications Act (SCA) [is] being cited as a reason for services such as Facebook to withhold access to deceased individuals’ accounts, passwords, stored photos, etc.” Five states have passed legislation related to control of deceased individuals’ online accounts, and undoubtedly more state legislatures will follow suit.

The Internet Law Researcher article recommends a number of publications from legal and mainstream sources, including the recent law review student note by Maria Perrone, What Happens When We Die: Estate Planning of Digital Assets, and the blog Digital Passing. The recommended resources offer tips for developing a plan to handle digital assets after death, and serve as a good supplement to the Goodson Law Library’s collection of estate planning guides, most of which do not discuss digital assets in detail.

Digital Files After Death, What Happens to Your Digital Legacy?

Have You Completed Your Client’s Digital Estate Plan?

I’m sure you are comfortable that your clients’ estate plans are up to date. But have you reviewed your client’s digital estate plan? What is a digital estate plan? It’s a plan for the disposition of all your clients internet accounts once he or she is deceased

Experts have estimated that the average adult with access to the internet has more than 25 internet accounts! In the past, we kept albums full of snapshots, vinyl records and shoeboxes full of correspondence. Now our photos are all on Flickr and IPhoto, our music is downloaded from ITunes and our correspondence is email via Yahoo or Google.

And probably more important than that, a lot of your clients bank and investment accounts may be entirely online.!

And what happens if your client dies? Who has access to these internet accounts? And if they want those accounts taken off the internet how do they do it? You may discover that it is more difficult than you think to access their accounts or erase them from the internet

The family of Ricky Rash, a 15 year old who committed suicide in 2011, discovered how difficult it was to recover information from their deceased son’s internet account. In an effort to understand why he had taken his own life, they requested but were refused access to his Facebook account. Facebook claimed that according to the Stored Communications Act of 1986 – the federal law that governs the protection of a person’s electronic data – even the account of a minor is protected from access by his parents or anyone else.  Other sites and providers interpret the legislation this way, making access all but impossible.

There are only five states that have taken any steps to help recover the internet data of a deceased person—Indiana, Idaho and Oklahoma legislation covers social media and blogging accounts, while Connecticut and Rhode Island legislation covers only email.

What does this mean for your clients? It is critical that they create a digital estate plan.The listing of internet accounts needs to be more comprehensive than I originally recommended. Information must include:

  • the name of the account
  • the contents of the account
  • the URL address
  • username
  • password
  • instructions for the disposition of the account including the person to oversee such disposition.
Digital planning
Digital planning

There is a whole new industry that has been created to service your clients’ digital estate , a new digital estate planning service. Your clients can create an account and then enter their user names, passwords and wishes for each of their digital assets. They can specify an heir for each account; Legacy Locker will provide heirs with information after the account holder’s death is verified.

There are also online memorial services to celebrate your client’s life. These services enable your clients to create their own memorials before they pass away. Facebook and Twitter also offer these services for family members.

The importance of having a digital estate plan will increase as more and more of our assets (and access to assets) are online. Gradually laws will evolve to give family members access to deceased loved ones’ accounts. It is important to prepare your clients for the disposition of their digital assets now so that family members will not be unpleasantly surprised when they attempt to uncover them.

If you want to explore digital estate planning in more detail feel free to wander around.