Digital Coming of Age and digital legacy

Digital Coming of Age and digital legacy

Digital Coming of Age and digital legacy
With the latest stage of AVG’s year-long study into the role of the internet in the upbringing of children and teens today, Digital Diaries: Coming of Age examines the teenage years (14-17) and discusses the potential harm that social networking activity could do to their future job prospects.

What we post on social networks now, can have a positive or negative impact on college, career or dating prospects in the future. What do you do to protect yourself from possible problems? How do you stay away from online situations that could reflect badly on you?

We took to our 950,000+ Facebook fans for answers about ways to protect yourself, both on Facebook and on other social networks in general:

If you wouldn’t say it in real life, don’t say it online.

I lock down my profile and only let my “friends” on here see my profile and wall. Everyone else only gets to see my picture and the “add as friend” button.

Control who can see your posts. If you see any old posts on your wall that could make for a bad situation in the present, go back and delete as many as you can.

Some things are meant to be private, it’s best if you keep them that way.

The world is full of gossipers and grapevines so only give them what you are happy with.

Remember, anything that you put on Facebook is permanent! The new Timeline feature is a definite reminder of that!

Be careful about which apps you install and which privileges you give them. Allowing apps to post on your behalf might lead to unwanted messages being sent “from you”.

It’s not just about status updates, keeping an eye on photos that you’ve been tagged in is also important. Evidence of “carefree behavior” might have a negative impact on your reputation.

What do you do to maintain a good standing on Facebook and other social networks? Come and join in the debate with our Facebook Community or on Twitter.

Learn How to Preserve Your Data with Take Control of Your Digital Legacy

US digital legacy laws in 2013

New Hampshire recently gave some thoughts about what happens to your facebook page when you die. More precisely, legislation is being changed so that an estate executor would be in a position to get a hold on the different social networks, emails, … after the death of the owner – which is something that is not the custom today.

Peter Sullivan is the State Rep. who started the movement of digital estate planning in the New Hampshire House of Representatives, which accepted this bill 222 to 128. The goal of these legislation is namely to give a better control of the situation to the persons who just suffered from a loss.

The other states so far are Rhode Island, Connecticut, Oklahoma, Idaho, and Indiana. The first and the second were the first states to introduce a control of digital legacy, but at the same time only applied on a limited number of services. Oklahoma was supported by a state legislator, Ryan Kiesel. Kiesel helped draft the texts, but according to his own advice, the issue must be addressed to by the federal government.

 

Let’s have a quick look at the different states and statuses. Here are attached links to the different texts concerning the current laws (as of beginning of 2013).

 

Rhode Island: The legislation simply allows an executor to access the accounts of emails of the departed.

Source: http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE33/33-27/33-27-3.htm

 

Connecticut : The same applies – and still the question of social networks is not raised.

Source: http://www.cga.ct.gov/2005/act/Pa/2005PA-00136-R00SB-00262-PA.htm

 

Indiana: The executor can be granted access to “information being stored online”.

Source: http://www.in.gov/legislative/ic/code/title29/ar1/ch13.html

 

Okhlahoma: The text gives the executor (or an estate administrator) the right to be granted the access to emails, as well as social networks, accounts.

Source: http://legiscan.com/OK/bill/HB2800/2010

 

Idaho: The Idaho text allows the executor to take over and control the account of the decedent, including the Facebook, Twitter, as well as any email provider. The major difference resides in the fact that the executor can resume the use of the account, even on a posthumous base.

Source: http://legislature.idaho.gov/legislation/2011/S1044.pdf

 

Towards an eternal online presence : of artificial intelligence and death.

One has to wonder about posterity.

Coursera has been offering machine learning classes to anyone – usually in batches of 80000 students. The technology behind it is simple: you look at a lot of information, and you extract patterns. For example, you look at the weather parameters today and you can guess, statistically, what is going to be the weather tomorrow. You analyse a list of groceries and you can determine whether or not the buyer is pregnant. This already happened.

But groceries list is only a drop in the sea of the digital content we create. We have your emails, tweets, posts on social networks. In a sense, it is us. Given a stimulation, how do we react? What are our thinking models? It’s something that can be modelized.

And it’s something that is being done by After Life Technology, who is taking of our openly accessible publications, and uses it to guess our behaviour. In a sense, they are reanimating us, and they can do so because of the footprint, the legacy that we have left behind.

Let’s go a step further the usual thinking. a silicon brain can access your personality, so why shouldn’t it be able to manage your assets? Take any writer: the stream of revenues given to him by royalties normally can go to his/her heirs. What about a portion to be used to buy electricity and equipment for a bot who can still use the huge amount of text, conferences, interviews, drafts, emails, that he sent to publish new content and interact with admirers?

The boundaries between life, death and online presence are thinning ..

Is Your Digital Life Ready for Your Death?

Your cyberfootprint

Neil Armstrong may have been imprinting the moon with a famous step, but you are creating everyday a series of footsteps that may live forever — or at least long enough to bother you. You know, your cyber footprint.

The websites that you browse, the emails you sent, receive and forward, the status updates on social networks, the movies you mention having appreciated, even the points your are collecting on online games, .. the list would be long enough.

When speaking of legacy, this footprint often becomes a problem to manage for those who remain. What will become of it? Who can benefit from the online revenue generating you have been generating? Who will pursue the work you had started? What will become of those embarrassing mails you had sent previously?

Previously, people had wills written for their earthly possessions. Your books, photos, all the small souvenirs that you shared with loved ones could be shared with the ones you wanted. But what about your cyber footprint? All of your assets, or most of them, are locked with a password, and services providers don’t usually pass your digital belongings to any other than you.

The traditional things we have done for estate planning—proof of death, changing titles, all those sorts of things—may need to change in this new context of digital assets,” says Dennis Kennedy, a St. Louis, Missouri, technology attorney who is also a recognized expert on how technology intersects with the law. “One of the last questions you tend to ask is, ‘What happens when somebody dies?’ Nobody is planning to die. Very few people want to think about that and what is going to happen to their stuff, but it has to be done, and it has gotten more complicated with the addition of digital assets.

That’s why it’s always interesting to have a guide to help you through your issues.

Texts from the dead: Post-mortem digital communication has arrived

The different types of digital assets

Why do you need to consider the becoming of your digital assets upon your passing? Just because there are more than what you actually think. If you can’t list them all, chances are that they will not be listed by someone else, and precious heritage can finally be lost for everyone. Or, if there are things that you wish were deleted, but were not, your last message may not be the one you wished for.  Inside the different assets type, you have:

Business accounts: let’s say you own an account for any business. It’s full of your clients information,  invoices and different bills. These information are critical for your business partners, colleagues or the whole team. For a doctor, it may contain the life history of your patients, with full, potentially life-saving, information.

Social media accounts: obviously, you won’t be able to communicate with your network, but the social networks do have a treasure inside: old exchanges, pictures, videos and other assets. And they can be the base of an online memorial.

Financial assets: this one is quite self-explanatory. Banks are more and more accessible via web interfaces, and may have services storing online currency, like bitcoins. And we’re not speaking about the Amazon, eBay, Paypal websites..

and last but not least:

Personal assets: can you list the totality of your services? I guess not.. Pictures, videos, emails, texts, mms, smartphone apps, … And why not computers, locked by passwords, or medical records, legal files, …