Digital death is still a problem. A widow’s battle to access her husband’s Apple account

Ch II : Planning For The Digital Afterlife

Transferring property, wealth, assets, and family heirlooms from one generation to another has always been a primary focus of proper . The electronic and of the twentieth century, society’s reliance on the Internet and electronic commerce (“e-commerce”), and the growth of cloud computing have given rise to a new digital world of assets which may be accessible across the world through a variety of mediums. Due to their importance in our everyday life, financial and sentimental value, and continuing growth, should be considered as a part of any . Digital assets and online accounts have the potential to continue indefinitely. As with any asset that can exceed the lifespan of the original owner, estate planning for digital assets is a vital part of the preservation of one’s legacy and property disposition. Many individuals unknowingly leave a significant amount of digital assets unaccounted for after death. For example, by the end of 2012, over 30 million Facebook users have died, leaving no directions as to the handling of their accounts. Failure to consider digital assets as part of the estate planning can result in loss of items that contain sentimental and financial value for the deceased relatives. According to a 2011 McAfee study, the average Internet user places a value of $37,438 on their digital assets,3 while a U.S.-based Internet user values their digital assets near $55,000.  The growth and development of the digital world has also changed the manner in which businesses operate, store information, market products, and reach consumers. The U.S. e-commerce industry is valued at nearly $225 billion.  Today, businesses often rely on a wide range of digital assets to ensure a strong web presence through online storefronts, e-commerce services, and cloud-based products, as many consumers expect businesses to have both brick-and-mortar locations while offering online access. These digitized assets are crucial to the company’s success and functionality and, at the same time, represent the growing digitalization of business assets. The average business insists that up to 20% of its digitally stored information is critical to operations. This percentage is likely to increase over time as companies continue to rely upon electronically stored information. Accordingly, proper estate planning and business succession plans are needed to protect and manage digitized business assets. Digital assets, without a doubt, add a new wrinkle to the already complex legal practice of estate planning. can be especially problematic because digital assets are often difficult to locate without proper guidance from the decedent. Without a well-designed digital estate plan, locating and disseminating digital assets is akin to searching for buried treasure with neither a treasure map nor a shovel. Further, accessibility and transferability issues can arise as these digital assets are often spread across various , email accounts, online , and digital devices. Providing access and location information regarding digital assets via wills creates security concerns as their location and passwords may become public.

The expansive nature of digital assets and the aforementioned issues surrounding this novel area of law triggers the need for more precise and well-developed asset management systems. This Essay defines the scope of digital assets, discusses unique challenges digital assets provide for traditional estate planning, and concludes with a viable strategy for the creation of a well-developed and manageable digital estate plan

Eleanore

Eleanore

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