Funerals and Instagram: A look at the funeral hashtags

OP-ED: Inheritance of on-line accounts after demise

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Dying within the digital age means leaving two worlds as a substitute of 1.

One is the bodily world, the place your physique resides. The different is the web world, the place your digital self exists. When you die, your family members turn into chargeable for each — but they’ve only a few instruments to take correct care of the net “you.”

This is a rising drawback nationally and in Oregon, as older residents change into extra Internet-savvy and folks of all ages conduct extra of their private and monetary enterprise on-line. Oregon lawmakers needs to be ready to deal with this subject in 2015, with assist from privateness advocates and property attorneys: Our legal guidelines are ailing-outfitted to cope with the difficult actuality of having access to others’ accounts, household pictures saved within the cloud, and even password-protected telephones.

Last week, a number one group of legal professionals beneficial that states undertake a number of proposals to make it simpler for surviving relations and executors of estates to realize entry to your digital belongings if you die. This group, often known as the Uniform Law Commission, says digital paperwork needs to be handled very similar to paper paperwork in a file cupboard. In most instances, a surviving cherished one or ought to get quick access with out having to petition a decide or bounce by months of hoops.

Same goes for pictures and recordsdata that is likely to be saved on-line: Unless the particular person specified in any other case in a will, belief or person decide-in settlement, that individual’s digital belongings must be as accessible as their bodily property, the group says.

“Technology is creating these belongings each day, and the regulation is woefully behind,” stated former state lawmaker Lane Shetterly, an Oregon lawyer who served on the workgroup that hammered out the suggestions. The group’s intent is to ascertain good public coverage round higher entry, he defined, whereas additionally carving out methods for folks to guard their on-line privateness, even in loss of life.

“This is a balancing act,” Shetterly instructed The Oregonian editorial board on Tuesday.

Digital privateness is rising as a sizzling subject for the 2015 legislative session, and coping with the digital belongings of a deceased individual is prone to be a part of the combo. Oregon lawmakers could also be shocked to find that lots of the similar Internet firms that appear awfully informal about customers’ privateness are sometimes probably the most reluctant to share account data with surviving family members, each due to firm insurance policies and competing federal legal guidelines.

Oregonians could discover themselves debating surreal questions corresponding to: How can we hold a digital self out of authorized purgatory? How ought to we outline a superb ?

This would have gave the impression of gibberish 5 years in the past. Now, it’s a pure extension of residing with our heads — and a part of our souls — within the digital cloud.


OP-ED: Inheritance of online accounts after death

Dying in the digital age means leaving two worlds instead of one.

One is the physical world, where your body resides. The other is the online world, where your virtual self exists. When you die, your loved ones become responsible for both — yet they have very few tools to take proper care of the online “you.”

This is a growing problem nationally and in Oregon, as older citizens become more Internet-savvy and people of all ages conduct more of their personal and financial business online. Oregon lawmakers should be prepared to tackle this issue in 2015, with help from privacy advocates and estate attorneys: Our laws are ill-equipped to deal with the tricky reality of gaining access to others’ Facebook accounts, family photos stored in the cloud, and even password-protected phones.

Last week, a leading group of lawyers recommended that states adopt several proposals to make it easier for surviving family members and executors of estates to gain access to your digital assets when you die. This group, known as the Uniform Law Commission, says electronic documents should be treated much like paper documents in a file cabinet. In most cases, a surviving loved one or executor should get easy access without having to petition a judge or jump through months of hoops.

Same goes for photos and files that might be stored online: Unless the person specified otherwise in a will, trust or user opt-in agreement, that person’s digital assets should be as accessible as their physical property, the group says.

“Technology is creating these assets on a daily basis, and the law is woefully behind,” said former state lawmaker Lane Shetterly, an Oregon attorney who served on the workgroup that hammered out the recommendations. The group’s intent is to establish good public policy around better access, he explained, while also carving out ways for people to protect their online privacy, even in death.

“This is a balancing act,” Shetterly told The Oregonian editorial board on Tuesday.

Digital privacy is emerging as a hot topic for the 2015 legislative session, and dealing with the digital assets of a deceased person is likely to be part of the mix. Oregon lawmakers may be surprised to discover that many of the same Internet companies that seem awfully casual about users’ privacy are often the most reluctant to share account information with surviving loved ones, both because of company policies and competing federal laws.

Oregonians may find themselves debating surreal questions such as: How can we keep a virtual self out of legal purgatory? How should we define a good digital death?

This would have sounded like gibberish five years ago. Now, it’s a natural extension of living with our heads — and a good part of our souls — in the digital cloud.

Eleanore

Eleanore

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