Who will get your iTunes when you die?

Control of a digital property – AA case

We often forget that digital property is part of our daily lifes, especially when the conditions create distance between us and the physical world. This is the case with Alison Atkins. She died at 16, of a long struggle with disease, and got more and more connected to the online due to her situation.

Because her sister could not gain access to her computer at first, then to the online services which hosted her writings, poems and pictures, the accounts have been closed one after another, like parts of her online existence getting erased.

The reason behind this is that the law, privacy law, makes it great for living users to control their information, but nothing is prepared for the death of the very same users. To make things even more complicated, these laws completly differ from one country to another. In the case of Alison, they found out a some writings that were made to stay hidden, and service providers are in their right not to disclose the communications.

A google representative mentionned that “It’s crucial to strike a balance” between families and the user’s right to privac

Clear rules needed for managing digital afterlife

eBook: table of content.

BOOK

I. Introduction

II. Good practices

III. Steps to follow: an audit

  • 1. Do an online cartography
  • 2. Remove what you don’t use
  • 3. Cloud what you can
  • 4. Update a password list
  • 5. And do it regularly

IV. To be prepared if sh*t happen

  • Prepare a will executor
  • A trendy alternative
  • Prepare a digital legacy locker
  • Do you want a physical locker ?
  • Prepare your data flows today
  • Write out instructions for each package
  • The Poor Man solution
  • Get to know more

V. Bye

  • Beware !
  • Thanks!
  • Long live the King (or Queen)
  • BONUS
  • A service checklist

List of services // digital legacy tools 

Death policies of your the different services you may use

Digital death laws

As per today, laws are not uniform around the globe, even in a single country like the US. Connecticut, Idaho, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and Indiana are the only states so far to have laws concerning post mortem digital asset management. And even within this group, assets are not classified evenly : for example, 2005 Connecticut only considered an email address in its text.

However, the common point is that the aim of passing laws is to grant access to the digital executor of the dead person.